Price Comparisons for fludrocortisone

 

fludrocortisone

Fludrocortisone is used by veterinarians in the treatment of Addison's Disease.

For: Cats and Dogs

Benefits:

How it works: Fludrocortisone acetate is a mineralocorticoid, similar in action to aldosterone, which acts on the kidney to help balance the concentration of sodium and potassium in your pet’s body.

 

Cautions: If your pet experiences increased blood pressure, sudden weight gain, difficulty breathing, hives, or swelling of the lips, tongue or face, stop giving Fludrocortisone and seek emergency veterinary medical attention.

Fludrocortisone Acetate Tablet:
Active Ingredient (per gram) Amount
Fludrocortisone Acetate 0.1 mg

Directions:

Tip: Keep plenty of water available for the pet to drink. Fludrocortisone should be given with food. Do not stop giving this medication suddenly if the pet has been on the medication for a few weeks. A gradual reduction in dosage may be required before stopping this medication.

Dosage:
Pet Weight Dosage
Dogs: All weights The usual dose is 0.009mg per pound of pet’s body weight once daily with food
Cats: All weights The usual dose is 0.1mg once daily with food
Horses: X X
Storage: Store this product at room temperature.

Dosage & Administration: Give this medication exactly as directed by your veterinarian. Do not give more or less than is prescribed by the veterinarian. If you do not understand the directions ask the pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you. In dogs, the usual dose is 0.009mg/pound once a day. In cats, the usual dose is 0.1mg per cat once a day. Keep plenty of water available for the pet. Fludrocortisone should be given with food. Do not stop giving this medication suddenly if the pet has been on the medication for a few weeks. A gradual reduction in dosage may be required before stopping this medication. Store fludrocortisone at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep this medication away from children and pets.

Possible side effects of Fludrocortisone: If any of the following serious side effects occur, stop giving fludrocortisone and seek emergency veterinary medical attention; an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; swelling of the lips, tongue or face; hives), increased blood pressure or sudden weight gain. Other less serious side effects may occur. Continue giving fludrocortisone and talk to your veterinarian if your pet experiences insomnia, nausea, vomiting or stomach upset, fatigue, muscle weakness or joint pain, problems with diabetes control or increased hunger or thirst. Other side effects that occur rarely, usually with high doses of fludrocortisone include thinning of the skin, cataracts, glaucoma, behavior changes. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to the animal.

If you miss giving a dose: Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it almost time for the next dose, skip the dose missed and give only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not give a double dose of this medication.

If you overdose the pet: Seek emergency veterinary medical treatment. A single large dose of fludrocortisone is unlikely to cause symptoms or death. An overdose is more likely to occur due to large doses being taken over a period of time. Symptoms of overdose may include swelling or water retention, high blood pressure, weight gain, low levels of potassium in the blood, and Cushing's disease.

Fludrocortisone should not be use in: Avoid sources of infection. Do not use any vaccines without checking with the veterinarian.

What other drugs will affect Fludrocortisone: Do not give any other over the counter or prescription medications, including herbal products, during treatment with fludrocortisone without first talking to the veterinarian. Tell your veterinarian if your pet is taking Phenobarbital, furosemide, insulin or glipizide, phenytoin, digoxin, warfarin, or aspirin. Drugs other than those listed may interact with fludrocortisone resulting in side effects or altered effectiveness.